mirage

The Distance between Perception and Reality in the Social Domains of Life

LACER-LACEA/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Lora, Eduardo en
dc.description.abstract The distance between perception and reality with respect to the social domains of life is often striking. Using survey data collected on Latin American countries, this paper provides an overview of the main empirical findings on the gaps between perception and reality in four social domains--health, employment, the perception of security, and social ranking. The overview emphasizes the psychological biases that may explain the gaps. Biases associated with cultural values are very relevant with respect to health and job satisfaction. Cultural differences across countries are pronounced in perceptions of health, while cultural differences across socioeconomic groups are more apparent with respect to job satisfaction. Affect and availability heuristics are the dominant sources of bias in the case of perceptions of security. The formation of subjective social rankings appears to be less culturally dependent but more dependent on the socioeconomic development in the country. The gaps between objective and subjective indicators in the social domains of life are a rich source of data to help understand how perceptions are formed, identify important aspects of people's lives that do not appear in official indicators, inform public debate on social policy, and shed light on public attitudes on key social issues. en
dc.format.extent 45 en
dc.subject Social Development en
dc.title The Distance between Perception and Reality in the Social Domains of Life en
dc.identifier.jel Z13 - Economic Sociology ¿ Economic Anthropology ¿ Social and Economic Stratification en
dc.identifier.jel J28 - Safety ¿ Job Satisfaction ¿ Related Public Policy en
dc.identifier.jel I19 - Health: Other en
dc.contributor.other RES-DOCS-USER
dc.contributor.other REPOSITORY
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-23T18:28:23Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-23T18:28:23Z
dc.date.issued 2013-08-14
dc.identifier.uri http://www.iadb.org/en/publications/publication-detail,7101.html?id=70726
dc.format.medium ACROBAT
dc.language.iso en
dc.relation.ispartof http://thesaurus.iadb.org/publicthesauri/116828715809062098558186
dc.subject IDB-WP-423
dc.type Working Papers
lacea.language.supported en
dc.date.modified 2016-12-01T16:55:37Z
dc.description.abstract2 The distance between perception and reality with respect to the social domains of life is often striking. Using survey data collected on Latin American countries, this paper provides an overview of the main empirical findings on the gaps between perception and reality in four social domains¿health, employment, the perception of security, and social ranking. The overview emphasizes the psychological biases that may explain the gaps. Biases associated with cultural values are very relevant with respect to health and job satisfaction. Cultural differences across countries are pronounced in perceptions of health, while cultural differences across socioeconomic groups are more apparent with respect to job satisfaction. Affect and availability heuristics are the dominant sources of bias in the case of perceptions of security. The formation of subjective social rankings appears to be less culturally dependent but more dependent on the socioeconomic development in the country. The gaps between objective and subjective indicators in the social domains of life are a rich source of data to help understand how perceptions are formed, identify important aspects of people¿s lives that do not appear in official indicators, inform public debate on social policy, and shed light on public attitudes on key social issues.
dc.keywords Perception of health
dc.keywords Social domains
dc.keywords Perception of security
dc.keywords Heuristics
dc.keywords Job satisfaction
dc.keywords Perception and reality


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search LACER-LACEA


Browse

My Account