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Integration & Trade Journal: Volume 16 : No. 35 : July-December, 2012

LACER-LACEA/Manakin Repository

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dc.contributor.author Ruta, Michele en
dc.contributor.author Venables, Anthony J. en
dc.contributor.author Rozenwurcel, Guillermo en
dc.contributor.author Katz, Sebastián en
dc.contributor.author Piñeiro, Martín en
dc.contributor.author Bianchi, Eduardo en
dc.contributor.author Arellano, José Pablo en
dc.contributor.author Perrone, Nicolás Marcelo en
dc.contributor.author Hamanaka, Shintaro en
dc.contributor.author Tafgar, Aiken en
dc.contributor.author Dos Santos, Enestor en
dc.contributor.author Zignago, Soledad en
dc.contributor.author Cavalcanti, Carlos Eduardo G. en
dc.contributor.author Meloni Nassar, André en
dc.contributor.author Santa Gadea, Rosario en
dc.contributor.author Messere, Vanina en
dc.contributor.author Gómez Minujín, Gala en
dc.contributor.editor INTAL en
dc.description.abstract The last decade has seen a significant increase in the exports of several Latin American and Caribbean countries to destinations within and beyond the region. The increase in trade links has not, however, been accompanied by a proportional increase in reciprocal investments among the trading partners. This precludes making the most of clear advantages, including the possibility of diversifying and upgrading trade links by overcoming trade barriers imposed by distance and cultural differences, and by the greater availability of capital and knowledge flowing to recipient countries. In these countries, there is the additional creation of new jobs and the mitigation of the social costs generated by mismatches in labor markets that are the result of trade and integration among sometimes widely differing trading partners. en
dc.format.extent 154 en
dc.subject Agricultural policy en
dc.subject Integration & Trade en
dc.subject Rural development en
dc.subject Natural Resources Management en
dc.title Integration & Trade Journal: Volume 16 : No. 35 : July-December, 2012 en
dc.coverage.placename Argentina en
dc.coverage.placename Brazil en
dc.coverage.placename Uruguay en
dc.coverage.placename Paraguay en
dc.coverage.placename Chile en
dc.coverage.placename China en
dc.coverage.placename Venezuela en
dc.coverage.placename Mexico en
dc.coverage.placename Bolivia en
dc.contributor.other PPALUMBO
dc.coverage.spatial AndeanCom;CentralAm;MERCOSUR;SouthAm
dc.date.accessioned 2013-01-04T18:57:08Z
dc.date.available 2013-01-04T18:57:08Z
dc.date.issued 2012-12-06
dc.identifier.isbn 1995-9532
dc.identifier.issn 1995-9532
dc.identifier.uri http://www.iadb.org/en/publications/publication-detail,7101.html?id=66669
dc.format.medium ACROBAT
dc.language.iso en
dc.relation.ispartof http://thesaurus.iadb.org/publicthesauri/142492204367809977573811
dc.subject INTAL, Agriculture, Trade, Rural Development, Environment, Sustainability
dc.type Magazines, Journals & Newsletters
lacea.language.supported en
dc.date.modified 2016-08-17T03:13:31Z
dc.description.abstract2 The last decade has seen a significant increase in the exports of several Latin American and Caribbean countries to destinations within and beyond the region. The increase in trade links has not, however, been accompanied by a proportional increase in reciprocal investments among the trading partners. This precludes making the most of clear advantages, including the possibility of diversifying and upgrading trade links by overcoming trade barriers imposed by distance and cultural differences, and by the greater availability of capital and knowledge flowing to recipient countries. In these countries, there is the additional creation of new jobs and the mitigation of the social costs generated by mismatches in labor markets that are the result of trade and integration among sometimes widely differing trading partners. It is also worth remembering that the increase in trade ties and the behavior of investors show important differences among Latin American and Caribbean subregions alike, and also in relation to the rest of the world. From the region¿s point of view, these differences are reflected in various different patterns of specialization and modalities of international integration, each of which opens up real and, above all, potential spaces for cooperation and mutual learning. The most dynamic in the last decade has been the export of resource-intensive goods, with low -albeit variable- degrees of processing.


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